ROCKY HILL MUSICAL THEATRE COMPANY IN THE NEWS

ROCKY HILL MUSICAL THEATRE COMPANY IN THE NEWS

Musical Director: Ebrentia has taken on the role of Musical Director for the new musical Getting There being performed by the Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company in August this year.

There’s a word in Afrikaans that describes how Ebrentia Brits is feeling at the moment. Angstig.
According to Ebrentia, it describes a mix of nervousness and excitement.
Ebrentia has taken on the role of Musical Director for the new musical Getting There being performed by the Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company (RHMTC) in August this year.
“I love the challenge, and I love it that I have this opportunity for this challenge, but I have to admit I’m very anxious as well,” she said.
And what a challenge it’s been.
Two months ago she had no sheet music available. Until a week ago a crucial song hadn’t been written and the band has yet to be assembled, but things are finally coming together in time for the first rehearsal, on Sunday, May Sunday 6.
A seasoned performer in her own right, Ebrentia has never been the musical director of a musical before. Mind you, two years ago she had never even been in a musical.
Skip forward two years and she has now appeared in key roles in three productions with the RHMTC … Seussical, Villains & Vixens and Joseph.
And just as she took on the challenge of acting, she answered the call to take on this challenge because of her belief in taking risks and using your talents.
“I think you need to challenge yourself in life or you stagnate,” said Ebrentia.
“You need to stretch your self and make use of all the skills God gave you. There are so many talented people in this town with amazing talent that never get seen and shows like this give them a chance to show those talents.”
“That’s another attraction to this role for me… that it I’m out of the spotlight and that I can help bring out the best in others and give them the chance to shine.”
While musicals are relatively new to Ebrentia, music isn’t. Well before she tried her hand at musical theatre, Ebrentia had a successful career as a pop singer in South Africa and even sang the theme of a South African television show.
While she has mostly placed her singing career on the back burner to concentrate on her family in more recent times, she also managed to make it to the top 100 of Australian Idol in 2007.
And she also plays a prominent role in the musical team at her church.
“The reason I want to use my talents is to use what God has given me… to glorify him and to serve others,” she said.
“Music is a gift to share with each other which can bring joy and can heal. I feel it’s a great way to connect and relate to people and musicals are an extension of that.”
Another potential cause of nervousness is that this is a brand new musical… never performed before. It’s a mammoth task to develop the sound of the musical for it’s world debut but she has faith in the material.
“I definitely think this musical has a good story line and important themes that people will connect with, but it’s also a lot of fun,” said Ebrentia.
“The great Australian songs by Pat Drummond give it its unique flavour, and Pat has been incredibly generous in letting us adjust the lyrics of a couple of the songs so that they work together even though they weren’t written to be one integrated piece.”
Ebrentia said there is an open invitation to anyone who would like to be in the band for this show.
Rehearsals for Getting begin on Sunday May 6 at the Old Tully Park Tavern.

There’s a word in Afrikaans that describes how Ebrentia Brits is feeling at the moment. Angstig.
According to Ebrentia, it describes a mix of nervousness and excitement.
Ebrentia has taken on the role of Musical Director for the new musical Getting There being performed by the Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company (RHMTC) in August this year.
“I love the challenge, and I love it that I have this opportunity for this challenge, but I have to admit I’m very anxious as well,” she said.
And what a challenge it’s been.
Two months ago she had no sheet music available. Until a week ago a crucial song hadn’t been written and the band has yet to be assembled, but things are finally coming together in time for the first rehearsal, on Sunday, May Sunday 6.
A seasoned performer in her own right, Ebrentia has never been the musical director of a musical before. Mind you, two years ago she had never even been in a musical.
Skip forward two years and she has now appeared in key roles in three productions with the RHMTC … Seussical, Villains & Vixens and Joseph.
And just as she took on the challenge of acting, she answered the call to take on this challenge because of her belief in taking risks and using your talents.
“I think you need to challenge yourself in life or you stagnate,” said Ebrentia.
“You need to stretch your self and make use of all the skills God gave you. There are so many talented people in this town with amazing talent that never get seen and shows like this give them a chance to show those talents.”
“That’s another attraction to this role for me… that it I’m out of the spotlight and that I can help bring out the best in others and give them the chance to shine.”
While musicals are relatively new to Ebrentia, music isn’t. Well before she tried her hand at musical theatre, Ebrentia had a successful career as a pop singer in South Africa and even sang the theme of a South African television show.
While she has mostly placed her singing career on the back burner to concentrate on her family in more recent times, she also managed to make it to the top 100 of Australian Idol in 2007.
And she also plays a prominent role in the musical team at her church.
“The reason I want to use my talents is to use what God has given me… to glorify him and to serve others,” she said.
“Music is a gift to share with each other which can bring joy and can heal. I feel it’s a great way to connect and relate to people and musicals are an extension of that.”
Another potential cause of nervousness is that this is a brand new musical… never performed before. It’s a mammoth task to develop the sound of the musical for it’s world debut but she has faith in the material.
“I definitely think this musical has a good story line and important themes that people will connect with, but it’s also a lot of fun,” said Ebrentia.
“The great Australian songs by Pat Drummond give it its unique flavour, and Pat has been incredibly generous in letting us adjust the lyrics of a couple of the songs so that they work together even though they weren’t written to be one integrated piece.”
Ebrentia said there is an open invitation to anyone who would like to be in the band for this show.
Rehearsals for Getting begin on Sunday May 6 at the Old Tully Park Tavern.

Musical Director: Ebrentia has taken on the role of Musical Director for the new musical Getting There being performed by the Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company in August this year.

David Cole - Goulburn Post - 31 January 2017

The Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company will be performing a brand new, home-grown musical, Getting There in August.
An information information night about it is being held this Friday, February 2 from 7pm at the Essential Employment and Training building (the old Tully Park Tavern) on Taralga Road.
Written by Chris Gordon and featuring the songs of Pat and Geoff Drummond, the show features a lot more dialogue than any of their previous shows and director Chris Gordon described it as as an “evolutionary step.”
“There wasn’t a lot of dialogue in Seussical or Joseph and his Technicolour Technicolor Dreamcoat, so I think it’s an obvious next step for us to take,” he said.
“I think it will stretch us and test out our acting chops.”
Mr Gordon, who also wrote the musical revue Villains and Vixens for the company last year, said it would challenge the company in more areas than just acting and singing.
“For Seussical and Joseph, we hired shows that had already been performed,” he said.
“So with that we received a whole lot of materials to assist with the production that we don’t have this time around. We’re building this from the ground up – no score, no arrangement, no designs and no audience familiarity.
“It’s a mammoth undertaking and a bit nerve-wracking, but I’m confident we can put together something really special.”
Mr Gordon said Getting There had a conventional style not unlike MGM musicals, but with a genuine Australian flavour supplied by Pat Drummond’s music.
While perhaps not as well-known as some of the leading lights in Australian country music, Pat Drummond has collected a swag of awards in over 40 years as a performer including a Tamworth Lifetime Achievement Award.
Mr Gordon said that one of the aims of the show was to introduce Drummond’s music to wider audience.
“Pat has this treasure trove of great songs that paint so many aspects of contemporary Australia,” he said.
“He had his performance origins in Aussie pub rock, before gradually shifting into folk and country from when he played with the Bushwhackers, and all of those influences are in this show.
“He frequently returns to themes of bullying, standing up for yourself, rural dislocation and finding your way in the world and those are central themes of the show. There are some tragic and heartfelt moments, but a lot of fun as well.”
The story also covers a lot of ground… starting in suburban Sydney before moving to the Royal Easter Show, the Northern Territory and the South Coast of NSW.
Mr Gordon said that the doors are wide open for anyone to assist with the project in any way they can, be that on stage or off, whether they’ve been involved in a musical before or not.
“It’s going to take a village to make this thing,” he said.
“We need actors, singers, dancers and a band… we need backstage, wardrobe, makeup, design and construction… the whole kit and caboodle.”
“There are spots for kids, young kids through to teens… right through to the grandfather of one of the lead characters. We’d like to think there’s something for everyone.
“And if you’ve never done a show before, this is a good one to start with. There are lots of small parts, some that don’t sing at all, some that don’t speak at all. Being in a show is such an amazing experience, we urge anyone who has even vaguely considered the idea before to give us a thought.”
With no performing arts centre in town, the RHMTC has had to make use of a variety of venues for its three previous shows.
With Goulburn’s performing arts centre still some time away, the setting up of venues including sound and lighting has been an expensive exercise and Mr Gordon said he’d welcome any sponsors that might like to assist the show.
There is an information night for Getting There on Friday February 2 from 7pm at the Essential Employment and Training building (the old Tully Park Tavern) on Taralga Road.
Anyone interested in finding out more about the show is invited. For further information, contact Chris Gordon on cgordon1965@gmail.com.

SINGER: Pat Drummond.

SINGER: Pat Drummond.

The Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company will be performing a brand new, home-grown musical, Getting There in August.
An information information night about it is being held this Friday, February 2 from 7pm at the Essential Employment and Training building (the old Tully Park Tavern) on Taralga Road.
Written by Chris Gordon and featuring the songs of Pat and Geoff Drummond, the show features a lot more dialogue than any of their previous shows and director Chris Gordon described it as as an “evolutionary step.”
“There wasn’t a lot of dialogue in Seussical or Joseph and his Technicolour Technicolor Dreamcoat, so I think it’s an obvious next step for us to take,” he said.
“I think it will stretch us and test out our acting chops.”
Mr Gordon, who also wrote the musical revue Villains and Vixens for the company last year, said it would challenge the company in more areas than just acting and singing.
“For Seussical and Joseph, we hired shows that had already been performed,” he said.
“So with that we received a whole lot of materials to assist with the production that we don’t have this time around. We’re building this from the ground up – no score, no arrangement, no designs and no audience familiarity.
“It’s a mammoth undertaking and a bit nerve-wracking, but I’m confident we can put together something really special.”
Mr Gordon said Getting There had a conventional style not unlike MGM musicals, but with a genuine Australian flavour supplied by Pat Drummond’s music.
While perhaps not as well-known as some of the leading lights in Australian country music, Pat Drummond has collected a swag of awards in over 40 years as a performer including a Tamworth Lifetime Achievement Award.
Mr Gordon said that one of the aims of the show was to introduce Drummond’s music to wider audience.
“Pat has this treasure trove of great songs that paint so many aspects of contemporary Australia,” he said.
“He had his performance origins in Aussie pub rock, before gradually shifting into folk and country from when he played with the Bushwhackers, and all of those influences are in this show.
“He frequently returns to themes of bullying, standing up for yourself, rural dislocation and finding your way in the world and those are central themes of the show. There are some tragic and heartfelt moments, but a lot of fun as well.”
The story also covers a lot of ground… starting in suburban Sydney before moving to the Royal Easter Show, the Northern Territory and the South Coast of NSW.
Mr Gordon said that the doors are wide open for anyone to assist with the project in any way they can, be that on stage or off, whether they’ve been involved in a musical before or not.
“It’s going to take a village to make this thing,” he said.
“We need actors, singers, dancers and a band… we need backstage, wardrobe, makeup, design and construction… the whole kit and caboodle.”
“There are spots for kids, young kids through to teens… right through to the grandfather of one of the lead characters. We’d like to think there’s something for everyone.
“And if you’ve never done a show before, this is a good one to start with. There are lots of small parts, some that don’t sing at all, some that don’t speak at all. Being in a show is such an amazing experience, we urge anyone who has even vaguely considered the idea before to give us a thought.”
With no performing arts centre in town, the RHMTC has had to make use of a variety of venues for its three previous shows.
With Goulburn’s performing arts centre still some time away, the setting up of venues including sound and lighting has been an expensive exercise and Mr Gordon said he’d welcome any sponsors that might like to assist the show.
There is an information night for Getting There on Friday February 2 from 7pm at the Essential Employment and Training building (the old Tully Park Tavern) on Taralga Road.
Anyone interested in finding out more about the show is invited. For further information, contact Chris Gordon on cgordon1965@gmail.com.

David Cole - Goulburn Post - 26 October 2017

JOSEPH: Nathanael Patterson stars as Joseph in Joseph and the Amazing Technicolour Dreamcoat.

The Cathedral of Saint Saviour’s had many more than the usual number of attendees on Saturday, October 21 for the performance of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat performed by the Rocky Hill Musical Company.
Unusual also were the many young people occupying the pews, many of the cast were also young.
While the show took some liberties (some may think perhaps a little too much for the Cathedral setting), still one can imagine in Egypt at that time it would have been more so. However, the main story line followed closely the Biblical account.
Ann and I really enjoyed the performance as did the rest of the audience, judging by the applause.
At interval I had a question I asked Ann: “Who came to Egypt first – Moses or Joseph”? We both did not know the answer, but turning to the occupants in the pew behind, which consisted of a group of young girls, I asked if any had knowledge of the Bible? The youngest, about 11, immediately spoke up saying “I do” and answered our question. I said “where did you learn that?” and she said scripture at West Goulburn School.
What a pleasure to learn our public school system is allowing the education of the whole person for those that wish to participate.
This story of Joseph brings out many of life’s good and not so good points for us to follow or not follow. Jacob should have treated all the boys equally and given all the boys a coat of many colours. Of course Joseph’s dream did not help the situation.
But this story ends on a positive note that has stretched down through the ages to our day, even to this excellent most enjoyable performance in the Cathedral. A must see for all ages.

David Cole - Goulburn Post - 26 October 2017

JOSEPH: Nathanael Patterson stars as Joseph in Joseph and the Amazing Technicolour Dreamcoat.

The Cathedral of Saint Saviour’s had many more than the usual number of attendees on Saturday, October 21 for the performance of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat performed by the Rocky Hill Musical Company.
Unusual also were the many young people occupying the pews, many of the cast were also young.
While the show took some liberties (some may think perhaps a little too much for the Cathedral setting), still one can imagine in Egypt at that time it would have been more so. However, the main story line followed closely the Biblical account.
Ann and I really enjoyed the performance as did the rest of the audience, judging by the applause.
At interval I had a question I asked Ann: “Who came to Egypt first – Moses or Joseph”? We both did not know the answer, but turning to the occupants in the pew behind, which consisted of a group of young girls, I asked if any had knowledge of the Bible? The youngest, about 11, immediately spoke up saying “I do” and answered our question. I said “where did you learn that?” and she said scripture at West Goulburn School.
What a pleasure to learn our public school system is allowing the education of the whole person for those that wish to participate.
This story of Joseph brings out many of life’s good and not so good points for us to follow or not follow. Jacob should have treated all the boys equally and given all the boys a coat of many colours. Of course Joseph’s dream did not help the situation.
But this story ends on a positive note that has stretched down through the ages to our day, even to this excellent most enjoyable performance in the Cathedral. A must see for all ages.

Kevin Sasse - Letter to the Editor - Goulburn Post - 24 October 2017

The Cathedral of Saint Saviour’s had many more than the usual number of attendees on Saturday, October 21 for the performance of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat  performed by the Rocky Hill Musical Company. 
Unusual also were the many young people occupying the pews, many of the cast were also young.
While the show took some liberties (some may think perhaps a little too much for the Cathedral setting), still one can imagine in Egypt at that time it would have been more so. However, the main story line followed closely the Biblical account.
Ann and I really enjoyed the performance as did the rest of the audience, judging by the applause.
At interval I had a question I asked Ann: “Who came to Egypt first – Moses or Joseph”? We both did not know the answer, but turning to the occupants in the pew behind, which consisted of a group of young girls, I asked if any had knowledge of the Bible? The youngest, about 11, immediately spoke up saying “I do” and answered our question. I said “where did you learn that?” and she said scripture at West Goulburn School. 
What a pleasure to learn our public school system is allowing the education of the whole person for those that wish to participate.
This story of Joseph brings out many of life’s good and not so good points for us to follow or not follow. Jacob should have treated all the boys equally and given all the boys a coat of many colours. Of course Joseph’s dream did not help the situation. 
But this story ends on a positive note that has stretched down through the ages to our day, even to this excellent most enjoyable performance in the Cathedral. A must see for all ages.

TALENT: Nathanael Patterson as Joseph in the Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company's production of oseph and the Amazing Technicolour Dreamcoat.

TALENT: Nathanael Patterson as Joseph in the Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company's production of oseph and the Amazing Technicolour Dreamcoat.

The Cathedral of Saint Saviour’s had many more than the usual number of attendees on Saturday, October 21 for the performance of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat  performed by the Rocky Hill Musical Company. 
Unusual also were the many young people occupying the pews, many of the cast were also young.
While the show took some liberties (some may think perhaps a little too much for the Cathedral setting), still one can imagine in Egypt at that time it would have been more so. However, the main story line followed closely the Biblical account.
Ann and I really enjoyed the performance as did the rest of the audience, judging by the applause.
At interval I had a question I asked Ann: “Who came to Egypt first – Moses or Joseph”? We both did not know the answer, but turning to the occupants in the pew behind, which consisted of a group of young girls, I asked if any had knowledge of the Bible? The youngest, about 11, immediately spoke up saying “I do” and answered our question. I said “where did you learn that?” and she said scripture at West Goulburn School. 
What a pleasure to learn our public school system is allowing the education of the whole person for those that wish to participate.
This story of Joseph brings out many of life’s good and not so good points for us to follow or not follow. Jacob should have treated all the boys equally and given all the boys a coat of many colours. Of course Joseph’s dream did not help the situation. 
But this story ends on a positive note that has stretched down through the ages to our day, even to this excellent most enjoyable performance in the Cathedral. A must see for all ages.

David Cole - Goulburn Post - 10 October 2017

TALENT: Nathanael Patterson as Joseph in the Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company's production of oseph and the Amazing Technicolour Dreamcoat.

Popular musical Joseph and the Amazing Technicolour Dreamcoat is the next production of the Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company.
It opens on the evening of Thursday, October 19 in St Saviour’s Cathedral.
Director Deb McConnell said it was one of her favourite musicals. “It goes back to Sunday School, the story of Joseph: it was a childhood favourite,” she said.
“The music in it is fantastic and really varied. There is a wide palette of musical styles, from country ballads to also ‘70s songs to calypso as well as pseudo-Elvis styles.
“Musicians like it for that variety of styles as well as it just being toe-tapping music.”
She said there were lots of children involved in the show.
“Having lots of kids involved is great. They make it more lively and bubbly,” she said.
She said the cast also contained some great local talent.
“Nathanael Patterson as Joseph is a wonderful performer with an amazing voice and he is a good musician on the piano as well,” she said.
“This is an ideal role for him as he captures the character of Joseph really well.
“The two narrators Ebrentia Brits and Rebecca Sampson have huge roles. They have to carry the show from start to finish.
“Richard Orchard as an Elvis-styled Pharaoh is also something to see.”
Mrs McConnell has been involved with theatre since childhood.
“I was involved with the Lieder Theatre and the Argyle Society,” she said.
The show is being performed in the magnificent space that is St Saviour’s Cathedral.
“The Cathedral is such a special space, such a glorious place to sit and listen to people singing,” she said.
“It is cavernous and it will be very inspiring.
“We had to build a stage and work around the space because it is a practicing place of worship.
“This is a show for all ages. It has comedy, drama, quiet moments.”
It opens on Thursday, October 19 at 7.30pm and continues on October 20, 21, 27 and 28. 

David Cole - Goulburn Post - 27 April 2017

I had the pleasure to catch a dress rehearsal for Villains and Vixens.
I had never been in the old Marian Chapel before but I was captivated immediately by its beauty. What a lovely space – and then to fill that space with singing and music and dancing was a treat. 
Villains and Vixens is the latest production by the Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company and this company has some great singing talent among its ranks.  
The vocal range of Jane Van Dorp is on display as well as the amazing voices of Ebrentia Brits, Alex Ridley, Rachel Croft, Alecia Walker, Melissa Shoad, Brittany Lewis, Julia Galiazzo and Nathaniel Pattinson – fresh from playing in Les Miserables in Queanbeyan. Alfie Walker will also be appearing, but really – this whole cast has tremendous talent and energy. 
Popular songs from musicals such as Evita, Grease, Chicago, Wicked, Little Shop of Horrors, Phantom of the Opera, Les Miserables and more are featured.
These songs are woven together with a clever and witty narrative, written by Chris Gordon and delivered by the emcees – Ant Lewis and Caitlin Jiear.
Villains and Vixens is on in the Old Marian College Chapel at 7.30pm on April 28, 29 and May 5 with a charity matinee performance on April 30 at 2pm. Tickets available online at trybooking.com, go to Buy Tickets and search for Villains and Vixens. Some tickets at the door. More info call 0414 556 982.

Caitlin Jiear and Ant Lewis as emcees.

Caitlin Jiear and Ant Lewis as emcees.

I had the pleasure to catch a dress rehearsal for Villains and Vixens.
I had never been in the old Marian Chapel before but I was captivated immediately by its beauty. What a lovely space – and then to fill that space with singing and music and dancing was a treat. 
Villains and Vixens is the latest production by the Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company and this company has some great singing talent among its ranks.  
The vocal range of Jane Van Dorp is on display as well as the amazing voices of Ebrentia Brits, Alex Ridley, Rachel Croft, Alecia Walker, Melissa Shoad, Brittany Lewis, Julia Galiazzo and Nathaniel Pattinson – fresh from playing in Les Miserables in Queanbeyan. Alfie Walker will also be appearing, but really – this whole cast has tremendous talent and energy. 
Popular songs from musicals such as Evita, Grease, Chicago, Wicked, Little Shop of Horrors, Phantom of the Opera, Les Miserables and more are featured.
These songs are woven together with a clever and witty narrative, written by Chris Gordon and delivered by the emcees – Ant Lewis and Caitlin Jiear.
Villains and Vixens is on in the Old Marian College Chapel at 7.30pm on April 28, 29 and May 5 with a charity matinee performance on April 30 at 2pm. Tickets available online at trybooking.com, go to Buy Tickets and search for Villains and Vixens. Some tickets at the door. More info call 0414 556 982.

Chris Gordon - Goulburn Post - 17 April 2016

VIXEN OR VILLAIN?: Alex Ridley at rehearsals for Villains and Vixens at the Old Marian College Chapel. Photo Ila Storrier.

Alex Ridley doesn’t describe herself as either a villain or a vixen, although she concedes that villainy, like beauty, is in the eye of the beholder.
“It’s really a matter of perception,” she said.
“I can do one thing, or say one thing, and be a hero to one person and a villain to someone else.
It’s that matter of perception and perspective that intrigued her about the current Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company production of Villains and Vixens.
“As soon as I saw the theme, I thought `that’s great,’” Alex said.
“In my head I immediately started putting my producer/director cap on and thinking `if I was doing a show like this, what would it be about’? When I shared that with all of you before we started, it was like, yes, that’s what we’re doing, that’s where we’re going, so I immediately felt in sync with what the show is about.”
On one level, the revue looks at some of the less heroic, less “good” characters from musical theatre, but also examines along the way that how others see us is largely a matter of perspective. Sometimes the bad guys may not be so bad after all. Sometimes, the good guys may not be so good.
“I think the theme of the show, the message of the show is something all of us encounter on a day to day basis in terms of the face that we wear publicly, who are. I think we all play different roles in our lives,” Alex said.
“It’s a really interesting show and I think it will be great for the audience and very relevant to everybody and I think they’ll connect to it in different ways.”
An experienced performer who first took to the stage at the age of four, Alex’s performing arts resume is as varied as it is extensive. It includes school drama classes and performances, an invitation to dance with the premier dance company in Belgrade at the age of 18, university studies and subsequent teaching, presidency of the ANU theatre group, acting, singing, choreography, direction, production and back stage work.
But for the last 15 years, that resume has been gathering dust. Real world commitments and other priorities have come to the fore, but now she feels it’s time to shake off the dust and reacquaint herself with her lifelong passion. After reading a story in the Goulburn Post about this production, Alex decide to audition but despite her impressive curriculum vitae, she admits to being “absolutely terrified” at the thought of auditioning. And even after arriving, had to be coaxed out of the audience.

“It’s an exciting terrified,” she explained.
“You know, it’s the same feeling… whether you’re excited or terrified your body’s going through the same feelings but I’ll be perfectly frank, I was completely terrified because your always nervous before an audition, it doesn’t matter how seasoned you are, because you want to a do a good job.”
“Being out of the scene for so long, being a mum, so much of my life having changed in those 15 years, I did have those thoughts – Oh my God, can I do this again, how will rehearsals fit in – all of those things were going through my head. But my husband and kids were like, “just do it.”
She needn’t have worried.
Alex blew the production team away with her performance of Razzle Dazzle at auditions (a song she is singing in the revue) and continues to shine throughout rehearsals.
She joins a talented cast and crew in the show, staged in the gorgeous old Marian College Chapel.
Villains and Vixens is being performed on April 28 and 29 May 5, with a special charity matinee show for Goulburn Soroptimists on April 30.

David Cole - Goulburn Post - 16 Jan 2016

Something Wicked this way comes.
And not only something Wicked… also something Les Miserables… and something Chicago… not to mention something Jekyll and Hyde.
Hot on the heels of their popular Seussical musical, the Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company is now preparing for its second production, a musical revue called Villains and Vixens.
Co-director Chris Gordon said that the show would be a complete change of pace from Seussical.
“Seussical was a tremendous bunch of fun and was really popular with people of all ages,” he said.
“But this show isn’t really a kids’ show… and as it’s a revue, it doesn’t have the elaborate staging of a show like Seussical. But it has great songs and a strong storyline that connects the songs.”
The theme of the show, Villains and Vixens, pays tribute to some of the less heroic characters in musical theatre, but that doesn’t limit the songs or the production to two dimensional, black and white characterisation, Mr Gordon said.
“The concept for the show came from producer Kerrie Jiear and co-director Sarah Trama,” he said.
“And while we’re looking, mostly, at the less heroic characters, they don’t all wear black hats. Some of the villains are truly evil, but some are just a bit dodgy. Some of the vixens are real femme fatales, but some are just sassy and maybe a little naughty. These characters aren’t typically the stars of the show so it’s good to let them have their moment.
“There’s also a bunch of good guys as well, and the show is a bit of a musical conversation about what lies beneath the broad concepts of good and evil.”
The revue will feature songs from many well known musicals, with two Masters of Ceremonies introducing the songs and introducing the various themes. The Old Marian Chapel will add to the dramatic nature of the production.
“It’s a wonderful old building. Sarah Trama gained permission from the owners to use it for the performance, and it just opened up so many ideas and opportunities,” Mr Gordon said.

NEW MUSICAL: Rocky Hill's producer Kerrie Jiear, co-directors Sarah Trama and Chris Gordon, and musical director Michael Jiear.

 

“There are multiple entrance and exit points, a wooden spiral stair case and incredible acoustics. The building helps provide some of the drama and tension for our performances, so we won’t be getting in its way by adding any sets. It sounds quite minimal, but I think audiences will be blown away.”
Villains and Vixens will be performed at the Old Marian College Chapel on April 28, 29 and May 5 and 6, with plans for a charity performance on April 27. An information night will be held at the Chapel from 7pm on February 8, with open auditions on February 10 and 11.

NEW MUSICAL: Rocky Hill's producer Kerrie Jiear, co-directors Sarah Trama and Chris Gordon, and musical director Michael Jiear.

Something Wicked this way comes.
And not only something Wicked… also something Les Miserables… and something Chicago… not to mention something Jekyll and Hyde.
Hot on the heels of their popular Seussical musical, the Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company is now preparing for its second production, a musical revue called Villains and Vixens.
Co-director Chris Gordon said that the show would be a complete change of pace from Seussical.
“Seussical was a tremendous bunch of fun and was really popular with people of all ages,” he said.
“But this show isn’t really a kids’ show… and as it’s a revue, it doesn’t have the elaborate staging of a show like Seussical. But it has great songs and a strong storyline that connects the songs.”
The theme of the show, Villains and Vixens, pays tribute to some of the less heroic characters in musical theatre, but that doesn’t limit the songs or the production to two dimensional, black and white characterisation, Mr Gordon said.
“The concept for the show came from producer Kerrie Jiear and co-director Sarah Trama,” he said.
“And while we’re looking, mostly, at the less heroic characters, they don’t all wear black hats. Some of the villains are truly evil, but some are just a bit dodgy. Some of the vixens are real femme fatales, but some are just sassy and maybe a little naughty. These characters aren’t typically the stars of the show so it’s good to let them have their moment.
“There’s also a bunch of good guys as well, and the show is a bit of a musical conversation about what lies beneath the broad concepts of good and evil.”
The revue will feature songs from many well known musicals, with two Masters of Ceremonies introducing the songs and introducing the various themes. The Old Marian Chapel will add to the dramatic nature of the production.
“It’s a wonderful old building. Sarah Trama gained permission from the owners to use it for the performance, and it just opened up so many ideas and opportunities,” Mr Gordon said.
“There are multiple entrance and exit points, a wooden spiral stair case and incredible acoustics. The building helps provide some of the drama and tension for our performances, so we won’t be getting in its way by adding any sets. It sounds quite minimal, but I think audiences will be blown away.”
Villains and Vixens will be performed at the Old Marian College Chapel on April 28, 29 and May 5 and 6, with plans for a charity performance on April 27. An information night will be held at the Chapel from 7pm on February 8, with open auditions on February 10 and 11.

Mariam Koslay - Goulburn Post - 23 Nov 2016

DR SEUSS FAVOURITE: The performance follows Horton the Elephant's adventures (played by Dale Papworth), one of the main, lovable characters. Photo: Peter Oliver

SEUSSICAL EXTRAVAGANZA: The Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company performed to a packed hall on Thursday at Trinity college. The performance showcased Goulburn's young, talented artists and creatives. Photo: Mariam Koslay

Trinity Catholic College was packed on Thursday afternoon for the extravagant and captivating Seussical the Musical.
About 300 students from Goulburn North Public, Tambelin Independent and Crescent schools and the House with No Steps filled up the Great Hall for music, fun and colour.
Seussical the Musical, the first theatre performance by Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company, combines Dr Seuss’ most loved narrative.
The story closely follows Horton the elephant, from Horton Hears a Who, and his adventures.
Friendship, kindness and courage become recurring themes echoed through the show, with messages of character growth touching not only younger, but older audiences.
Director Lynda Yeadon said the musical was able to bring the passion from Dr Seuss’ books onto the stage.
“Bringing the Dr Seuss books to life gives children the chance to enjoy the stories in a personal way,” Ms Yeadon said.
“The stories are an inspiration to generations and this musical is a delight. We had so much fun creating the Jungle of Nool and Whoville”
The Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company is a newly formed performance group that plans to refocus attention on the joys of musicals.
An extra 560 students from the Wollondilly district will watch the second show next week. Seussical the Musical is a two-hour performance.
Shows will be running until December 3. Tickets can be purchased at trybooking.com.
For more information on future performances by the Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company or to get involved, email rockyhillmtc@gmail.com

PACKED HALL: Trinity Catholic College's Great Hall was filled with about 300 excited and enthralled students, teachers and guests on Thursday. Photo: Mariam Koslay

SCHOOL THEATRE: Lead dancer Emily Williams plays the Jungle of Nool for Seussical the Musical. The engaging theatre performance is a collation of Dr Seuss' most popular children's books. Photo: Peter Oliver

David Cole - Goulburn Post - 2 Nov 2016

SEUSSICAL The Musical is a fun show for all the family, based off the books written by Dr Seuss.
The show features favourite Dr Seuss characters including Horton The Elephant, The Cat in the Hat, The Whos from Whoville and The Grinch.
Seussical The Musical, by the Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company opens on November 18 in the Great Hall at Trinity Catholic College and continues on Friday and Saturday nights with daytime performances on Sundays.
For many performers, this is their first time on stage.
Tickets are on sale now and can be purchased online at trybooking.com or in person at the McKell Medical Centre.
The Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company has been working tirelessly to get their first ever production up an running.

Matilda Deng as the female Jojo.

FUN: Jane Van Dorp (The Cat in the Hat), with Joshua Arnold and Matilda Deng at rehearsals on the weekend.

CAST: The Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company cast of Seussical The Musical.

JOJO: Joshua Arnold is the male Jojo.

Costumes: Brittany Lewis and Caitlin Jiear hamming it up at rehearsals.

CAST: The Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company cast of Seussical The Musical.

SEUSSICAL The Musical is a fun show for all the family, based off the books written by Dr Seuss.
The show features favourite Dr Seuss characters including Horton The Elephant, The Cat in the Hat, The Whos from Whoville and The Grinch.
Seussical The Musical, by the Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company opens on November 18 in the Great Hall at Trinity Catholic College and continues on Friday and Saturday nights with daytime performances on Sundays.
For many performers, this is their first time on stage.
Tickets are on sale now and can be purchased online at trybooking.com or in person at the McKell Medical Centre.
The Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company has been working tirelessly to get their first ever production up an running.

Matilda Deng as the female Jojo.

JOJO: Joshua Arnold is the male Jojo.

FUN: Jane Van Dorp (The Cat in the Hat), with Joshua Arnold and Matilda Deng at rehearsals on the weekend.

Costumes: Brittany Lewis and Caitlin Jiear hamming it up at rehearsals.

David Cole - Goulburn Post - June 24 2016

NEW MUSICAL: Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company director Lynda Yeadon, producer Jane Van Dorp and musical director Kerrie Jiear recently.

THE newly formed Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company is planning to stage Seussical The Musical in Goulburn later in the year.
Seussical is based on the much-loved works of Dr Seuss, particularly the characters of Horton the Elephant and Gertrude McFuzz, among others.
The musical is by Lynn Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty and it debuted on Broadway in 2000.
It has become a classic that many schools, communities and regional theatres have since performed.
“Seussical is currently the most performed musical in America,” Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company (RHMTC) publicity officer Chris Gordon said.
“With the Cat in the Hat, Horton and even the Grinch in it, it’s a massive hit with kids, but it’s also hugely popular with adults because of a great story and really catchy songs.” To help stage the musical, RHMTC is hosting a fundraiser music night at the Goulburn Club on Friday, August 5 which will feature songs from a wide range of musicals. “The `Hills are Alive’ event is hoped to become a semi-regular thing,” Mr Gordon said.“As a brand new company, we are starting from scratch and need to raise money to help pay for the rights, productions costs and venue hire.

“As a brand new company, we are starting from scratch and need to raise money to help pay for the rights, productions costs and venue hire.
“For that reason, we’re asking for a slight increase from the usual gold coin donation. For a `paper money’ donation, the audience will hear 20 or so great songs from a wide range of musicals sung by some of Goulburn’s best known singers and a bunch of newcomers.”
“There’s still a few spots available if someone wants to perform on the night – just please keep the accompaniment simple.”
The RHMTC has been in existence since the demise of other musical theatre groups in Goulburn such as the Argyle Society and the Goulburn Musical Society.
Recent talk of a new Performing Arts Centre helped reignite interest in the formation of the new group.
President of the group, Goulburn Mulwaree councillor Alfie Walker said the RHMTC aimed at putting on at least two productions a year. The new group hoped to impart skills to up-and-coming talent.
“We also aim to make training available to younger people to train them in the skills of musical theatre,” Cr Walker said.
He said the significance of choosing Rocky Hill for a name came from it being a meeting place.
“It is an icon for the area: the rotating light provides a sense of belonging for people living here and it is a landmark that we have in common,” Cr Walker said.
“Rocky Hill has always been a meeting place for bringing people together.”

ANTONY DUBBER - Goulburn Post - April 15 2016

IT’S the ‘last hurrah’ in the 37 year history of The Argyle Society Inc, who will perform the Gilbert and Sullivan operetta Trial by Jury tonight in the Goulburn Workers Club auditorium. 
The Society was first formed by former Goulburn Teacher’s College principal Len Robinson and then lecturer Dr Paul Pavior in 1980.
It went on to host a number of productions around Goulburn, including several productions of Trial By Jury and many other Gilbert and Sullivan favourites such as Pirates of Penzance, The Mikado and Yeoman of the Guard.
Tonight’s Trial By Jury will be directed by Society stalwart Kate Robinson, with musical direction by John Buckley and production by Richard Orchard and Jane Van Dorp, themselves well known local actors and former Argyle Society members.
Trial by Jury is essentially about a jilted ex-fiancee and well-known socialite, Angelina, who pursues a ‘breach of promise’ in court against her now ex-boyfriend Edwin. 
Edwin is not known for consistency when it comes to love, and has often been accused of having a ‘roving eye’.
A synopsis of the play written by the late Len Robinson sums it up well:
“Global concerns with economic and political mayhem contract to insignificance compared to the prospective details expected to be revealed in Court to a hungrily receptive and conditioned Public,” Mr Robinson says.
“The Court Usher, an officer of immense dignity, takes it upon himself to offer some unofficial pre-instruction of the Jury, whose sentiments in any case appear to have already been influenced by numerous press releases of Angelina and her well turned ankles.”
The show will run this Friday and Saturday night from 7.30pm with a matinee performance on Saturday afternoon at 2pm. 
Saturday night will also be the Gala Performance with pre-show entertainment provided by local musician Dr Paul Paviour and some of the cast members. 
This is the ‘last hurrah’ for the Argyle Society, and they will officially ‘hand over the reins ‘to the newly formed group Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company Incorporated (RHMTC).
“Thank you from all of us to all of you, for the years of support, love, friendship, applause and unforgettable memories,” Mrs Van Dorp said.
“We couldn’t have done it without you.” 

READY: The cast and crew of the final show for the Argyle Society, Gilbert and Sullivan’s ‘Trial by Jury’ at their dress rehearsal on Wednesday night.
Photo: Isla Storrier.

READY: The cast and crew of the final show for the Argyle Society, Gilbert and Sullivan’s ‘Trial by Jury’ at their dress rehearsal on Wednesday night.
Photo: Isla Storrier.

IT’S the ‘last hurrah’ in the 37 year history of The Argyle Society Inc, who will perform the Gilbert and Sullivan operetta Trial by Jury tonight in the Goulburn Workers Club auditorium. 
The Society was first formed by former Goulburn Teacher’s College principal Len Robinson and then lecturer Dr Paul Pavior in 1980.
It went on to host a number of productions around Goulburn, including several productions of Trial By Jury and many other Gilbert and Sullivan favourites such as Pirates of Penzance, The Mikado and Yeoman of the Guard.
Tonight’s Trial By Jury will be directed by Society stalwart Kate Robinson, with musical direction by John Buckley and production by Richard Orchard and Jane Van Dorp, themselves well known local actors and former Argyle Society members.
Trial by Jury is essentially about a jilted ex-fiancee and well-known socialite, Angelina, who pursues a ‘breach of promise’ in court against her now ex-boyfriend Edwin. 
Edwin is not known for consistency when it comes to love, and has often been accused of having a ‘roving eye’.
A synopsis of the play written by the late Len Robinson sums it up well:
“Global concerns with economic and political mayhem contract to insignificance compared to the prospective details expected to be revealed in Court to a hungrily receptive and conditioned Public,” Mr Robinson says.
“The Court Usher, an officer of immense dignity, takes it upon himself to offer some unofficial pre-instruction of the Jury, whose sentiments in any case appear to have already been influenced by numerous press releases of Angelina and her well turned ankles.”
The show will run this Friday and Saturday night from 7.30pm with a matinee performance on Saturday afternoon at 2pm. 
Saturday night will also be the Gala Performance with pre-show entertainment provided by local musician Dr Paul Paviour and some of the cast members. 
This is the ‘last hurrah’ for the Argyle Society, and they will officially ‘hand over the reins ‘to the newly formed group Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company Incorporated (RHMTC).
“Thank you from all of us to all of you, for the years of support, love, friendship, applause and unforgettable memories,” Mrs Van Dorp said.
“We couldn’t have done it without you.” 

ANTONY DUBBER - Goulburn Post - April 1 2016

SWAN SONG: The cast for the upcoming Trial by Jury.

THE Argyle Society will be performing their ‘last hurrah’, Gilbert and Sullivan’s ‘Trial by Jury’ on April 15 and 16 at the Goulburn Workers Club.
This will then pave the way for the newly formed Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company (RHMTC) to start in earnest.
Director Kate Robinson told the Post that the reason why they chose Trial by Jury as their last hurrah was because it is an easy production with a minimum amount of fuss.
“It will be great to get some of the ‘old crew’ back again from the Argyle Society to perform this,” she said.
“And it will also be the last chance to see a show with limited sets and lighting, as our equipment was lost when we lost our Kenmore home a few years ago.”
There will be three performances over two days in April, with the first performance from 7:30pm on Friday, April 15 in the Goulburn Workers Club Auditorium, a matinee performance from 2pm and the ‘gala performance’, featuring well known local musician and composer Paul Paviour from 7:30pm on Saturday April 16.
“Doors open 30 mins prior to each show, with finger food and an open bar available,” Ms Robinson said.

SWAN SONG: The cast for the upcoming Trial by Jury.

THE Argyle Society will be performing their ‘last hurrah’, Gilbert and Sullivan’s ‘Trial by Jury’ on April 15 and 16 at the Goulburn Workers Club.
This will then pave the way for the newly formed Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company (RHMTC) to start in earnest.
Director Kate Robinson told the Post that the reason why they chose Trial by Jury as their last hurrah was because it is an easy production with a minimum amount of fuss.
“It will be great to get some of the ‘old crew’ back again from the Argyle Society to perform this,” she said.
“And it will also be the last chance to see a show with limited sets and lighting, as our equipment was lost when we lost our Kenmore home a few years ago.”
There will be three performances over two days in April, with the first performance from 7:30pm on Friday, April 15 in the Goulburn Workers Club Auditorium, a matinee performance from 2pm and the ‘gala performance’, featuring well known local musician and composer Paul Paviour from 7:30pm on Saturday April 16.
“Doors open 30 mins prior to each show, with finger food and an open bar available,” Ms Robinson said.

David Cole - Goulburn Post - January 27 2016

EVER since the demise of musical theatre groups in Goulburn about a decade ago, those who love this form of entertainment have been in mourning. 
But once again the hills will be ‘alive with the sound of music’ … well, Rocky Hill, anyway. 
Yes, the Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company has been formed and, no, ‘you can’t stop the music’ that will spill forth from this lively bunch, who held their first meeting on Sunday. 
Goulburn had previously had two musical societies: the Argyle Society and the Goulburn Musical Society. 
While neither group folded as such, they both went into lengthy hibernations.
The lack of a venue suitable to musical theatre was a significant reason that both groups went into hiatus.
Since their demise, many of the people involved have expressed withdrawal symptoms they’ve been suffering in the absence of an active musical theatre group in town. Recent talk of a new Performing Arts Centre reignited interest and Sunday’s meeting followed a call put out on Facebook to form a new group.

Attendees at the recent The Rocky Hill Musical Group inaugural meeting. (Left, back) Debra McConnell, Alecia Walker, Dr Rod McConnell, Martin Yeadon, Chris Gordon, Kate Robinson, Anthony Lewis, Catriona Wood, Andrew Wood, Leonard Buckley. (Front) Cr Alfie Walker, Lynda Yeadon, Jane Van Dorp and Sue Gardner.

On Sunday, the group elected a steering committee, which is in the process of incorporation, and it consists of a large group of enthusiasts.
President of the steering committee, Goulburn Mulwaree councillor Alfie Walker, said the group was looking at potential venues and potential shows.
“One is dependent on the other,” Cr Walker said.
“We are looking at venues that are available.
“What is exciting is that there is a real enthusiasm from older people associated with those previous musical groups.
“They have been missing musical theatre in the city.” Cr Walker said that, as well as putting on at least two productions a year, the new group hoped to impart skills to up-and-coming talent. 
We aim to make training available to younger people to train them in the skills of musical theatre,” Cr Walker said.“It would be great to harness the talent of young people coming through and it is great to have Andrew and Catriona Wood involved with the group to harness the talent coming through Mulwaree High musical program, for instance.” The Goulburn Regional Conservatorium has also been responsible for producing a lot of junior talent in the city.Cr Walker said the group was looking at doing a fundraiser show earlier in the year to possibly assist with staging a show with a larger cast show later in the year.The new group will cater for both mainstream musicals as well as the more operatic style of Gilbert and Sullivan type shows.
Cr Walker said the significance of choosing Rocky Hill for a name came from it being a meeting place.
“It is an icon for the area: the rotating light provides a sense of belonging for people living here and it is a landmark that we have in common,” Cr Walker said.
“Rocky Hill has always been a meeting place for bringing people together.”
He thanked the Lieder Theatre for filling the space for musical theatre in the intervening years.
Last year the Lieder ran two well attended productions, Hear the Lieder Sing and You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown.

Attendees at the recent The Rocky Hill Musical Group inaugural meeting. (Left, back) Debra McConnell, Alecia Walker, Dr Rod McConnell, Martin Yeadon, Chris Gordon, Kate Robinson, Anthony Lewis, Catriona Wood, Andrew Wood, Leonard Buckley. (Front) Cr Alfie Walker, Lynda Yeadon, Jane Van Dorp and Sue Gardner.

EVER since the demise of musical theatre groups in Goulburn about a decade ago, those who love this form of entertainment have been in mourning. 
But once again the hills will be ‘alive with the sound of music’ … well, Rocky Hill, anyway.
Yes, the Rocky Hill Musical Theatre Company has been formed and, no, ‘you can’t stop the music’ that will spill forth from this lively bunch, who held their first meeting on Sunday.
Goulburn had previously had two musical societies: the Argyle Society and the Goulburn Musical Society.
While neither group folded as such, they both went into lengthy hibernations.
The lack of a venue suitable to musical theatre was a significant reason that both groups went into hiatus.
Since their demise, many of the people involved have expressed withdrawal symptoms they’ve been suffering in the absence of an active musical theatre group in town. Recent talk of a new Performing Arts Centre reignited interest and Sunday’s meeting followed a call put out on Facebook to form a new group.
On Sunday, the group elected a steering committee, which is in the process of incorporation, and it consists of a large group of enthusiasts.
President of the steering committee, Goulburn Mulwaree councillor Alfie Walker, said the group was looking at potential venues and potential shows.
“One is dependent on the other,” Cr Walker said.
“We are looking at venues that are available.
“What is exciting is that there is a real enthusiasm from older people associated with those previous musical groups.
“They have been missing musical theatre in the city.
” Cr Walker said that, as well as putting on at least two productions a year, the new group hoped to impart skills to up-and-coming talent. 
We aim to make training available to younger people to train them in the skills of musical theatre,” Cr Walker said.
“It would be great to harness the talent of young people coming through and it is great to have Andrew and Catriona Wood involved with the group to harness the talent coming through Mulwaree High musical program, for instance.” 
The Goulburn Regional Conservatorium has also been responsible for producing a lot of junior talent in the city.
Cr Walker said the group was looking at doing a fundraiser show earlier in the year to possibly assist with staging a show with a larger cast show later in the year.
The new group will cater for both mainstream musicals as well as the more operatic style of Gilbert and Sullivan type shows.
Cr Walker said the significance of choosing Rocky Hill for a name came from it being a meeting place.
“It is an icon for the area: the rotating light provides a sense of belonging for people living here and it is a landmark that we have in common,” Cr Walker said.
“Rocky Hill has always been a meeting place for bringing people together.”
He thanked the Lieder Theatre for filling the space for musical theatre in the intervening years.
Last year the Lieder ran two well attended productions, Hear the Lieder Sing and You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown.

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